Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Cattle Producers Need a Strong Representative Body to Counteract Supermarket and Processor Power - Part 2 - Conclusions and Solutions

This newsletter is the second part of a two part series on the need to strengthen Australia’s grass fed cattle producer representative bodies in order to counteract increasing concentrations of supermarket and processor power.


Please click here to view the rest of the article.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Cattle Producers Need a Strong Representative Body to Counteract Supermarket and Processor Power - Part 1 - Identifying the Problems

This newsletter is the first of a two part series on the need to strengthen Australia’s grass fed cattle producer representative bodies in order to counteract increasing concentrations of supermarket and processor power.

Please click here to view the rest of the article.

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Conclusions and Solutions Synopsis

The Need to Strengthen Australian Grass Fed Cattle Industry Representation

Part 2 Synopsis

Introduction

Part 1 of HuntBlog’s newsletter on the need for cattle producers to have a strong representative body to counteract supermarket and processor power which was published on 20 April 2016 (a copy of which can be accessed in the "Featured Posts" section to the right or by clicking here) explored:

·         recent parliamentary inquiries into the grass fed cattle organisational structures and concentration of processor power

·         recent government attempts to curb the deleterious effects of increasing supermarket and processor power on the rural sector by strengthening the power of the ACCC

·         reports by the Australian Farm Institute and the National farmers Federation about the ineffectiveness of Australian rural advocacy groups in comparison to successful overseas models,

·         the unsustainable plight of the cash-strapped State Farmer Organisation (SFO) based grass fed cattle Peak Council, Cattle Council of Australia (CCA)

·         the relative financial and representative weakness of CCA in comparison to overseas service fee and levy funded rural advocacy bodies and other Australian levy funded rural advocacy and policy development organisations

·         the different outcomes achieved by American and Australian representative bodies with respect to the quantum of industry taxes and producers share of the retail dollar

Part 2 of that two-part HuntBlog newsletter regarding the need to strengthen Australian grass fed cattle industry representation will be published on 26 April 2016.
                                                                                                                                                          
Conclusions and Solution Synopsis

Next week’s Part 2 of HuntBlog’s newsletter on the need to strengthen Australian grass fed cattle industry representation in order to combat increasing supermarket and processor power will

·         explore examples of successful Australian and overseas rural representative body models that utilise a mix of service fee income and levies to fund their operations; and

·         examine some key recommendations from the recent Senate inquiry into Grass Fed Cattle Levy Funded Structures and Systems that could help strengthen Australian grass fed cattle representation if they were implemented in full or in part.

Part 2 of HuntBlog’s newsletter will also

·         examine possible sources of seed funding for the establishment of the proposed new grass fed cattle representative body proposed by the Grass Fed Cattle Levy Funded Structures and Systems Senate Inquiry report; and

·         suggest a number of levy payer plebiscites that should be conducted, in accordance with the provisions of the government’s Levy Principles and Guidelines, once that new grass fed cattle representative body is established.

Part 2 will also explore the importance of market information for cattle producers operating in a free market economy as well as the methods by which this could be achieved, such as the introduction of a mandatory price reporting system in Australia.

Part 2 will set out safeguard mechanisms that could be implemented through a Statutory Funding Agreement and an amended Memorandum of Understanding to

·         establish a concrete Chinese Wall to ensure that Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) receives sufficient funding to retain its key personnel and carry out its core activities; and

·         to ensure that any levy funds that all advocacy carried out by the new grass fed cattle representative body is funded from interest earned from the RMAC reserve funds and income from services provided to members and not from levies

Part 2 will also examine the proposition that all of MLA's non-core activities should be fully contestable and suggest that the proposed new grass fed cattle representative body model could be adopted by other sectors of the red meat industry.

Monday, December 7, 2015

Grass Fed Cattle Levy Senate Inquiry Recommendations and Price Transparency in the Australian Beef Industry


The release of the Seven Recommendations arising from the Senate Inquiry into grass-fed cattle levy funded
structures and systems last year was a watershed moment in the long debate over the changes that need to be made 
to the grass fed cattle organisational structures to meet the needs of the Australian grass-fed cattle industry in the 
21st century.

The seventh and final Recommendation of the Senate Standing Committee on Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport arising from the Senate Inquiry into Grass Fed Cattle Levy Industry Structures and Systems seems to have garnered the least attention from the industry.

Please click here to view the rest of the article.

Thursday, August 6, 2015

HuntBlog Newsletter: Has Barnaby Left the Door Open for Grass Fed Cattle Structural Reform by Plebiscite?

Following years of agitation for Red Meat Industry organisational reform by:
• the Australian Beef Association (ABA),
• the Australian Meat Producers Group think tank (AMPG),
• the hugely attended cattle producer forums in Roma in 2004, Armidale and Paradise Lagoons in 2010 which Minister Joyce either attended or spoke at, and
• agitation from the cash strapped Cattle Council of Australia (CCA) for access to some of the grass fed cattle transaction levies to provide it with the necessary funding to enable it to carry out its functions under the current red meat industry organisational structure,

the Minister for Agriculture Barnaby Joyce at a meeting with cattle producers in Townsville in early November 2013 agreed to call for a Senate Inquiry into the current grass fed cattle levy funded structures and systems. Minister Joyce advised the Townsville cattle producer meeting that it was time that the decade long cattle industry debate over organisational reform was brought to a head one way or another. Minister Joyce counselled those present that they would have to accept the findings of the Senate Inquiry as binding whatever they happened to be and that if the Senate Inquiry findings went against the cattle producers calls for reform they would need to accept those findings as “the umpire’s verdict”.

Please click here to view the rest of the article.

HuntBlog Newsletter: Preserving MLA

The Federal Government’s 15 July 2015 initial response to the Senate Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee report on grass fed cattle levies rejected implementation of that part of the Senate Committee’s recommendation which called for the formation of a grass fed cattle levy producer owned body that had the authority to receive and disperse all of the grass fed cattle transaction levies.

Please click here to view the rest of the article.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

HuntBlog newsletter: Use of levy funds by representative bodies

The Senate Inquiry Report into grass fed cattle levy funded structures and systems handed down last October produced seven interlocking recommendations aimed at enabling the grass fed cattle industry to meet its collective needs for the next decade or two.

The Federal Government Response to the Senate Inquiry seven interlocking recommendations published in Beef Central on 15 July 2015 adopted only one of the seven Senate inquiry recommendations in full and ruled out the key recommendation that the proposed new grass fed cattle producer body to replace the cash strapped Cattle Council of Australia (CCA) be given authority to manage all cattle transaction levies. 

Please click here to view the rest of the article.